The medical field is an evolving sector with new findings and strategies on the horizon. Medications have also been part of the evolution as different techniques and approaches have been introduced to make it easier for patients to consume their drugs. However, recent findings suggest that we might have been taking medicine the wrong way this entire time.

So what are some of the spotted wrong approaches, and how can we correct them? What are the ideal methods of swallowing pills, and what should we stick to? With a lot of confusing information out there, let’s screen through the different myths and facts in context.

Common Myths about Taking Pills

There are several misconceptions about swallowing tablets. They include;

    1. If you start feeling better, you can stop taking your medication. Many are times when you’re tempted to stop taking your pills once you start feeling better. You should complete your dose.
    2. Antibiotics are the solution to all illnesses. Antibiotics are not the answer to all diseases! Different diseases require different treatments.
    3. It doesn’t matter how you swallow a pill. You might tell yourself that taking your pills in a different way rather than what’s suggested on the label is suitable and convenient for you, but that’s so wrong.
    4. If you’re hurting a lot, you can take extra pills to ease your pain. When going through pain, people assume that taking a different medication is to relieve your pain.
    5. You don’t need to mention the vitamins you take to your doctor. You might assume that because vitamins are natural, you don’t need to tell your doctor about them. However, medicines can react differently. It is vital to consider telling your doctor before the prescription.
  • You can easily switch drugs if one doesn’t seem to work. Medications take time to work, and you should be patient with the process.
  • All painkillers are the same. All painkillers contain different components, and you should consider taking the prescribed one only.
  • There are no medical allergies. You can get allergies by consuming certain medicines.
  • Facts on Taking Pills

There are quite a number of facts on taking medications, such as;

  • Only take medicines you have a history with as it’s not encouraged to take different ones unless a doctor suggests so.
  • Antibiotics do not treat all illnesses. Don’t get antibiotics just because you are not feeling well, see a medical practitioner before getting any pills. In addition, antibiotics are different and not self-prescribed.
  • Always pay attention to the prescriptions on the labels of any drug administered to you. The pills are designed so that the quantity and the number of medications you take. You should check the prescriptions and follow the instructions accordingly.
  • You’re not supposed to take extra pills because of the risks associated with overdoes.

 

What You’ve Been Doing Wrong

Throughout time, there have been different approaches people take in swallowing medicine. However, due to the lack of knowledge and passed-on practices, people get things wrong in taking drugs. So what are some of the things you have been doing wrong?

  • Throwing the pills towards the back of your throat. You will have trouble swallowing if you have pill dysphagia.
  • Crushing pills or even altering your medicine without getting any medical advice from a health practitioner. What happens if you chew a pill instead of swallowing it is that it loses its effectiveness. Using your instructions can alter how the medicine works.
  • Tilting your head backward in an exaggerated manner makes swallowing difficult.
  • Knowing very well you have issues with your throat and swallow pills without any swallowing aids. Use pill cups for pill swallowing to simplify the procedure.
  • Taking pills that have already expired knowingly or unknowingly.
  • Quitting a particular medication after feeling well.
  • Going back to a previous uncompleted dose once symptoms arise again.
  • Taking extra pills to act as your pain relievers.
  • Not finishing the medicine prescribed to you.
  • Skipping doses. Sometimes skipping doses causes a significant problem which can result in potentially dangerous side effects.
  • Storing medicine wrongly. Most people keep drugs in the most inappropriate places in their homes! Some even store them in the bathrooms. The bathroom light can penetrate the drugs and weaken the medication’s efficiency. It is advisable to store medicine in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight.
  • Taking certain medications at the wrong time. You should follow the doctor’s advice on taking your medicine because that’s the most effective time for them to work on you. 

How to Correct the Mistakes

It’s never too late to change as you can adapt to several behaviors and make up for your mistakes. Some of the ways to correct those mistakes include;

  1. Storing the medicine in a cool, dry place to avoid losing its effectiveness.
  2. Finish all the medicine prescribed to you
  3. Check the expiry dates before swallowing any pills
  4. Using the best pill swallowing techniques that work for you. You should do thorough research on this! Pill cups ease the swallowing process!
  5. Taking prescribed medicine at the right time for efficiency purposes.
  6. Avoid skipping doses to avoid dangerous side effects.
  7. Follow the doctor’s or pharmacists’ advice when swallowing the pills. Do not introduce your swallowing concepts!

When to Consult Your Doctor

From time to time, you can experience various side effects of medicines. Most of them are easily managed at home. In case of severe symptoms and no progressive change, you’re supposed to see a doctor. Some of the red flags include;

  • Headaches
  • Common cold
  • Diarrhea
  • Flu
  • Digestive issues
  • Mental health problems.

Conclusion

There are very high chances you have been taking your medications wrongly. You should be more aware of the facts about swallowing pills to approach things the right way. It will help you make the right calls and avoid the typical mistakes made with taking medication.

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